Sleep complaints as early predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder: A 1-year prospective study of injured survivors of motor vehicle accidents

Danny Koren, Isaac Arnon, Peretz Lavie, Ehud Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Disturbed sleep is a common complaint among patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that appears in the reexperiencing and hyperarousal symptom clusters in DSM-IV. The causal relationship between sleep complaints and PTSD is unclear. Method: Self-reported insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness were assessed in 102 victims of motor vehicle accidents and 19 comparison subjects 1 week and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the trauma. At 12 months the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R was administered to determine diagnoses of PTSD. Results: Twenty-six of the accident victims but none of the comparison subjects met the criteria for PTSD. Logistic regression models indicated that sleep complaints from 1 month on were significant in predicting PTSD at 1 year. Conclusions: These results suggest that on the basis of sleep complaints as early as 1 month after the trauma, it is possible to detect subjects who will later develop chronic PTSD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)855-857
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume159
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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