Silver nanoparticles complexed with bovine submaxillary mucin possess strong antibacterial activity and protect against seedling infection

Daria Makarovsky, Ludmila Fadeev, Bolaji Babajide Salam, Einat Zelinger, Ofra Matan, Jacob Inbar, Edouard Jurkevitch, Michael Gozin, Saul Burdman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A simple method for the synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) of silver (Ag) in a matrix of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) was reported previously by some of the authors of this study. Based on mucin characteristics such as long-lasting stability, water solubility, and surfactant and adhesive characteristics, we hypothesized that these compounds, named BSM-Ag NPs, may possess favorable properties as potent antimicrobial agents. The goal of this study was to assess whether BSM-Ag NPs possess antibacterial activity, focusing on important plant-pathogenic bacterial strains representing both Gram-negative (Acidovorax and Xanthomonas) and Grampositive (Clavibacter) genera. Growth inhibition and bactericidal assays, as well as electron microscopic observations, demonstrate that BSM-Ag NPs, at relatively low concentrations of silver, exert strong antimicrobial effects. Moreover, we show that treatment of melon seeds with BSM-Ag NPs effectively prevents seed-to-seedling transmission of Acidovorax citrulli, one of the most threatening pathogens of cucurbit production worldwide. Overall, our findings demonstrate strong antimicrobial activity of BSM-Ag NPs and their potential application for reducing the spread and establishment of devastating bacterial plant diseases in agriculture.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere02212-17
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Acidovorax
  • Bacterial plant diseases
  • Metal nanoparticles
  • Mucin
  • Silver

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