Short-Term High-Flow Nasal Cannula for Moderate to Severe Bronchiolitis Is Effective in a General Pediatric Ward

Nimrod Sachs*, Eran Rom, Tommy Schonfeld, Rachel Gavish, Itay Berger, Irit Krause

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the clinical and physiological benefits of heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) in treating pediatric bronchiolitis in a general pediatric ward. Children aged 0 to 2 years, hospitalized with moderate to severe bronchiolitis, were connected to HHHFNC. Each child was evaluated at 4- to 10-hour intervals, both on and off the device, using the Wang et al Bronchiolitis Severity score and transcutaneous CO2 monitor. Sixteen children were included in the final analysis. The Bronchiolitis Severity score improved by 3 points during the first and second intervals (P =.001). Transcutaneous CO2 values were reduced by an average 8.7 mm Hg (P =.001). No adverse effects were noted in children connected to the device. The HHHFNC device used in a general pediatric ward setting served as a safe and efficacious tool in treating moderate to severe bronchiolitis. Immediate clinical and physiological improvement was observed and maintained 1 to 4 hours after disconnection from the device.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1522-1527
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume58
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

Funding

FundersFunder number
Medical Technology Unit
Petah Tikva
Schneider Children’s Medical Center

    Keywords

    • bronchiolitis
    • bronchiolitis score
    • heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula
    • pediatric
    • transcutaneous CO

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