Shame and the Psychosocial Costs of Contemporary Work: Implications for Career Intervention

Rachel Gali Cinamon*, David L. Blustein

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article explores the concept of shame and integrates it into career development and career counseling. The article begins with an overview of shame from a diverse conceptual framework, describing shame as a self-conscious emotion that occurs in response to interactions or events that evoke embarrassment, humiliation, self-doubt, and psychological distress. We discuss the prevalence of shame in work-based interactions and contexts, which is referred to as work shame. Building on this integrative review of shame within the working context, we describe the counseling implications and provide a case study to illustrate the ways in which shame emerges in clients' lives and potential strategies to resist and transcend shame.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-253
Number of pages16
JournalCareer Development Quarterly
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • career counseling
  • career development
  • psychology of working theory
  • relational theories
  • shame

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