Severe heat stroke in an intensive care unit: course of the disease in the intensive care unit, and early and subsequent treatment results

A. Halkin, D. Lev, O. Szold, P. Bidermann, S. Bulocnic, P. Halpern, P. Sorkine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During the August 1998 heat wave in Tel Aviv we admitted many patients for acute heat-related illness; 6 had severe heat stroke and were admitted in critical condition. We describe their clinical courses during the first 5 days of hospitalization, including response to treatment and implications for future management of this disorder. The mean APACHE II score of the 6 was 30 +/- 3.5 and mean Glasgow Coma Scale rating 3.5 +/- 0.5; they were in hypovolemic shock and respiratory failure, necessitating mechanical ventilation. Despite early effective therapy (core temperature in all was reduced to less than 39 degrees C in less than 1 hour), there was 1 death (mortality 15%) and 4 required further intensive care for life-threatening multiple organ failure. During severe heat waves a significant number of referrals for acute heat-related illness must be anticipated, possibly overwhelming admission capacity of regional intensive-care units. Severe heat stroke complicated by multi-organ failure is not necessarily related to prior physical activity. Although important in determining prognosis, early treatment does not prevent severe complications. Mechanisms regulating body heat may remain disturbed for days following early treatment and apparent stabilization, mandating continued hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-13, 88
JournalHarefuah
Volume137
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

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