Sequential infection of Daphnia magna by a gut microsporidium followed by a haemolymph yeast decreases transmission of both parasites

Florent Manzi*, Snir Halle, Louise Seemann, Frida Ben-Ami, Justyna Wolinska

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over the course of seasonal epidemics, populations of susceptible hosts may encounter a wide variety of parasites. Parasite phenology affects the order in which these species encounter their hosts, leading to sequential infections, with potentially strong effects on within-host growth and host population dynamics. Here, the cladoceran Daphnia magna was exposed sequentially to a haemolymph-infecting yeast (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) and a gut microsporidium (Ordospora colligata), with experimental treatments reflecting two possible scenarios of parasite succession. The effects of single and co-exposure were compared on parasite infectivity, spore production and the overall virulence experienced by the host. We show that neither parasite benefited from coinfection; instead, when hosts encountered Ordospora, followed by Metschnikowia, higher levels of host mortality contributed to an overall decrease in the transmission of both parasites. These results showcase an example of sequential infections generating unilateral priority effects, in which antagonistic interactions between parasites can alleviate the intensity of infection and coincide with maladaptive levels of damage inflicted on the host.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1566-1577
Number of pages12
JournalParasitology
Volume148
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Nov 2021

Funding

FundersFunder number
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

    Keywords

    • Coinfections
    • Metschnikowia
    • Ordospora
    • priority effects
    • zooplankton

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Sequential infection of Daphnia magna by a gut microsporidium followed by a haemolymph yeast decreases transmission of both parasites'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this