Saphenous vein harvesting for coronary artery bypass grafting. Retrospective analysis of possible causes of major wound complications in patients with peripheral arterial disease

R. Avrahami*, M. Haddad, A. Koren, G. Sivak, J. Dahan, A. Zelikovski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: to retrospectively evaluate the possible reasons for major wound complications at the saphenous vein harvesting site in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design: retrospective study. Material and methods: fifteen consecutive patients admitted to the vascular department for impaired healing at the saphenous vein harvesting site after successful coronary bypass artery grafting (CABG) (Group A) were evaluated for medical, perioperative, laboratory and pathological factors and outcome. Findings were compared with those in 15 matched controls followed in the outpatient clinic after CABG (Group B). Results: absence of pedal pulses in the affected leg was noted in 13 patients in group A and 3 patients in group B. Ankle brachial index ranged from 0.4-0.7 in group A and 1.7-1.1 in group B; corresponding ankle pressures were 40-100 mmHg (mean 60 mmHg) and 80-160 mmHg (mean 110 mmHg). All patients in group A had PAD, whereas none did in group B, and all patients in group A required intervention to save the leg. Wound healing was noted in 11 group A patients; four patients underwent below-knee amputation. Conclusion: saphenous vein harvesting from limbs with severe PAD can lead to significant morbidity, including limb loss. In patients lacking a palpable pedal pulse, we recommend harvesting only the proximal saphenous vein.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-426
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CABG
  • PAD
  • Saphenous harvesting
  • Wound complications

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