Role of fibronectin in attachment of Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli to human cell lines and isolated oral epithelial cells

Lena Stanislawski, W. Andrew Simpson, David Hasty, Nathan Sharon, Edwin H. Beachey, Itzhak Ofek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We studied the binding of cells of Streptococcus pyogenes and mannose-sensitive Escherichia coli to human fibroblast cell lines and isolated buccal epithelial cells in relation to the cell-associated endogenous or exogenous fibronectin of the host cells. The degree of bacterial binding to cell lines correlated directly with the content of endogenous fibronectin on the surface of the cultured cells, although the correlation was better with S. pyogenes that with E. coli. The addition of exogenous plasma fibronectin to the cell lines or oral epithelial cells enhanced binding of S. pyogenes but suppressed binding of mannose-sensitive E. coli. These findings are consistent with the notion that exogenously acquired fibronectin on the surface of host cells modulates bacterial adherence by providing attachment sites for certain pathogens, such as S. pyogenes, and by blocking receptors for others, such as mannose-sensitive E. coli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-259
Number of pages3
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

Funding

FundersFunder number
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesR01AI013550

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Role of fibronectin in attachment of Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli to human cell lines and isolated oral epithelial cells'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this