Role of ELISA D-dimer test in patients with unstable angina pectoris presenting at the emergency department with a normal electrocardiogram

David Shitrit, Ariella Bar Gil Shitrit, Bernard Rudensky, Jaqueline Sulkes, Natan Gutterer, Dan Zviony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients with unstable angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction have higher than normal D-dimer levels. The aim of the study was to determine the value of the D-dimer test in patients with unstable angina pectoris and a normal electrocardiogram on presentation at the emergency department. The study sample included 81 patients who met these criteria. Blood samples collected at admission were subjected to ELISA D-dimer. Findings were correlated with coronary risk factors, use of cardiac medications, blood levels of acute phase reactants (fibrinogen and C-reactive protein), cardiac enzymes levels, length of hospital stay, and catheterization findings. ELISA D-dimer levels were statistically significantly correlated with cardiac risk factors, namely male sex, older age, smoking, and hypertension (r = 0.25, P = 0.02; r = 0.43, P = 0.0001; r = 0.26, P = 0.03; r = 0.35, P = 0.002, respectively), in addition to use of cardiac medications (beta blockers, aspirin, nitrates), levels of acute phase reactants, length of stay, and catheterization findings. On multivariate analysis, only D-dimer level, age, and sex were predictors of length of stay (P = 0.018). The study suggests that D-dimer levels at admission to the emergency department may serve as an additional tool to predict the magnitude of unstable angina pectoris in patients with a normal electrocardiogram.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-150
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Hematology
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Keywords

  • D-dimer
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Length of stay
  • Unstable angina pectoris

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