Risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in a tertiary hospital in Israel

Wasef Na’amnih, Amos Adler, Tamar Miller-Roll, Dani Cohen, Yehuda Carmeli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To estimate the rate and identified risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) in Israel. We conducted a retro-prospective case-control study of all adult (age ≥ 18 years) patients with an initial episode of CDI (iCDI) at Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014. We collected demographic, clinical, and epidemiological information for patients who were classified as recurrent (cases) and non-recurrent (control) groups. In total, 648 patients with iCDI were identified in the study. During the 36-month study period, 82 (12.7%) patients had at least one rCDI identified. We identified several factors as independent variables significantly associated with recurrent CDI: functional disability, severity of the initial infection, continuous non-Clostridium difficile antibiotic treatment with third-generation cephalosporins or clindamycin, and iCDI treatment with metronidazole and vancomycin; however, neutropenia had high measure of effect as a predictor for rCDI (adjusted odds ratio, 7.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.27–49.58; p = 0.026). The identification of the main modifiable risk factors for recurrent CDI, continuous non-Clostridium difficile antibiotics after diagnosis of the initial infection, and antibiotic treatment with third-generation cephalosporins or clindamycin are critical in reducing the spread of recurrent infection with Clostridium difficile in hospital.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1281-1288
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile infection
  • Israel
  • Recurrent
  • Risk factors

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