Reversible switching of ultrastrong light-molecule coupling

Tal Schwartz*, James A. Hutchison, Cyriaque Genet, Thomas W. Ebbesen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Strong coupling of light and matter can give rise to a multitude of exciting physical effects [1]. Following the first observation of strong coupling between a cavity and dye molecules [2], organic molecules have been increasingly used for the study of strong coupling, since their large transition dipole moment permits the observation of Rabi splitting in the range of a few hundreds of meV at room temperature. However, organic molecules, as we show here, can also be used for combining light-matter interaction with molecular functionality [3], and for the study of strong coupling at the interface between physics and chemistry [4]. Remarkable, the light-molecule interaction in our system enters the regime of ultrastrong coupling [5], where the energy splitting is substantial fraction of the coupled transition energies, and new phenomena such squeezed vacuum state and generation of entangled photon pairs are predicted.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011 - Munich, Germany
Duration: 22 May 201126 May 2011

Publication series

Name2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011

Conference

Conference2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityMunich
Period22/05/1126/05/11

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