Resolution of recalcitrant chronic papillary conjunctivitis associated with epiphora following punctoplasty and lacrimal stenting

Itay E. Gabbay*, Yoav Nahum, Yiftach Yassur, Inbal Avisar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the use of lacrimal stenting for chronic papillary conjunctivitis associated with epiphora in young adults with little or no atopic background. Methods: A retrospective interventional case series of 21 consecutive patients (36 eyes) treated for epiphora and chronic papillary conjunctivitis at a tertiary university-affiliated medical center between January 2014 and August 2015 by the same oculoplastic surgeon (I.A). Data were collected by retrospective file review. Patients with a history of ocular disease were excluded from the study. Treatment modalities included lacrimal stenting, punctoplasty, and conservative topical medication. The main outcome measure was post-treatment presence of epiphora and conjunctivitis. Results: Mean patient age was 40 ± 11 years; 86% of patients were female. Fifteen (72%) had bilateral disease. Mean follow-up time was 3.9 ± 1.7 months. Delayed tear clearance as well as a patent lacrimal apparatus were noted in all eyes. No apparent cause of the symptoms was found in any of the eyes. In 12 of the 13 patients (92%) who underwent tube or stent placement, the conjunctivitis and epiphora resolved. In the remainder, symptoms resolved bilaterally in only 1 of 4 patients (25%) who underwent punctoplasty and in only 1 of 4 patients (25%) treated conservatively. Conclusion: Recalcitrant papillary conjunctivitis improves following nasolacrimal stenting. Further studies are needed using a prospective controlled design and longer follow-up time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)380-383
Number of pages4
JournalCanadian Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Resolution of recalcitrant chronic papillary conjunctivitis associated with epiphora following punctoplasty and lacrimal stenting'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this