Repetitive thinking as a psychological cognitive style in midlife is associated with lower risk for dementia three decades later.

Ramit Ravona-Springer, Michal Schnaider Beeri, Uri Goldbourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

AIMS: To examine the association of a reported tendency toward repetitive thinking (RT) in midlife when confronting difficulties in family and work settings with dementia many years later. METHODS: A tendency toward RT was assessed in approximately 9,000 male participants in the Israeli Ischemic Heart Disease study in 1965. The subjects were categorized according to their tendency toward RT in familial and work settings as: 1 = always forget; 2 = tend to forget; 3 = tend to think repetitively, and 4 = usually think repetitively. Dementia was assessed over 3 decades later in 1,889 participants among 2,604 survivors of the original cohort. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of dementia were 24, 19, 15 and 14% in the 4 groups of tendency toward RT in stressful work situations with superiors (p for trend < 0.0002), respectively. The prevalence rates of dementia were 21, 18, 14 and 14% in the 4 groups of tendency toward RT in familial situations (p for trend < 0.004), respectively. These associations held after multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The tendency toward RT when confronting distress is associated with a lower risk for dementia. Future studies should assess possible mechanisms and potentials for intervention and modification.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-520
Number of pages8
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Repetitive thinking as a psychological cognitive style in midlife is associated with lower risk for dementia three decades later.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this