Regulation by PGE2 of the production of oxygen intermediates by LPS-activated macrophages

Z. Metzger, J. T. Hoffeld, J. J. Oppenheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The regulation by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) of production of oxygen radicals by bacterial lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) activated macrophages was studied in vitro. A 48-hr incubation of murine thioglycollate-elicited macrophages with LPS (0.1 μg/ml) resulted in an enhanced ability of these cells to produce oxygen radicals when challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Macrophages incubated for 48 hr without LPS did not produce measurable amounts of oxygen radicals when exposed to this triggering stimulus. Thus, PMA-triggered production of oxygen radicals was the result of macrophage activation by LPS. The PMA-triggered production of oxygen radicals by the LPS-activated macrophages was inhibited when PGE2 (10-5 to 10-9 M) was present during the incubation with LPS. Inhibition by PGE2 occurred during the early stages of macrophage activation, since the addition of PGE2 24 hr after LPS no longer inhibited the production of oxygen radicals by the macrophages. This inhibitory effect of PGE2 on the LPS-induced activation of macrophages could be reproduced by cyclic-adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) agonists, such as isoproterenol and cholera toxin as well as by the cAMP analog dibutyryl-cAMP, suggesting a cAMP-mediated mechanism for the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on macrophage activation by LPS. Previous reports have implicated prostaglandins as mediators of destructive processes associated with chronic inflammation. Our findings suggest that PGE2 may, on the other hand, reduce tissue damage in a chronic inflammatory site by inhibiting the production of oxygen radicals by macrophages activated in the sera.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1109-1113
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume127
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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