Reduction of common-mode electromagnetic interference in isolated converters using Negative feedback

L. Katzir, S. Singer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In the field of power electronics, there is a trend for pushing up switching frequencies of switched-mode power supplies to reduce volume and weight. This trend causes an increasing level of electromagnetic interference (EMI) emissions. It is well known that common-mode EMI is resulted in by the switching of a parasitic capacitance of transistors, diodes, and transformers the power circuit consists of, which implies current flow to ground (actually the shielding) of the circuit. In this paper a method of common-mode EMI reduction, based on a negative feedback which implies compensating current flow is presented. . More specifically, desired EMI reduction in the family of isolated DC/DC converters is achieved by means of a compensating transformer winding and a capacitor. An isolated flyback converter was constructed and tested in the Power laboratory in Tel-Aviv University. Using a spectrum analyzer, it was found that the common-mode EMI created by the parasitic capacitance of the switching transistor decreased between 10 and 15 dB in the low frequency harmonics of the converter.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2006 IEEE 24th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel, IEEEI
Pages180-183
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event2006 IEEE 24th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel, IEEEI - Eilat, Israel
Duration: 15 Nov 200617 Nov 2006

Publication series

NameIEEE Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel, Proceedings

Conference

Conference2006 IEEE 24th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel, IEEEI
Country/TerritoryIsrael
CityEilat
Period15/11/0617/11/06

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