Reclassification of gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae: Cecidomyiini) from amaranthaceae, with description of ten new species based on an integrative taxonomic study

Netta Dorchin, Einat Shachar, Ariel Leib Leonid Friedman, Omri Bronstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The genus Halodiplosis includes 99 species restricted to host-plants of the Amaranthaceae, virtually all of which are from Central Asia. The discovery of numerous undescribed species putatively belonging to this genus in Israel instigated an exhaustive review of the original descriptions of all known species in this genus. This study revealed that the generic concept of Halodiplosis and some of the genera synonymized under it should be redefined based on morphological and lifehistory attributes, such that Halodiplosis is limited to only 13 species developing in plant tissues without obvious gall formation or as inquilines in galls of other cecidomyiids. Revised status were proposed for Asiodiplosis, Onodiplosis, and Desertomyia, all species of which are gall inducers. A detailed morphological study of the Israeli species combined with data on their life history and an analysis of mitochondrial COI and 16S gene sequences revealed nine gall-inducing species belonging to Asiodiplosis and one inquilinous species belonging to Halodiplosis. All ten species (Asiodiplosis admirabilis n.sp., A. bimoda n.sp., A. delicatula n.sp., A. largifica n.sp., A. mohicana n.sp., A. mucronata n.sp., A. paradoxa n.sp., A. pillosaeconspicua n.sp., A. stellata n.sp., and Halodiplosis fugax n.sp.) are described here as new to science, including the first descriptions of larvae and pupae for these genera.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1126
JournalInsects
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Asiodiplosis
  • Bud galls
  • Halodiplosis
  • Host plant
  • Salsoloideae

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