Recent progress towards centimetric spatial resolution in distributed fibre sensing

Luc Thévenaz, Stella Foaleng-Mafang, Kwang Yong Song, Sanghoon Chin, Jean Charles Beugnot, Nikolay Primerov, Moshe Tur

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Optical fibre sensors based on stimulated Brillouin scattering have now clearly demonstrated their excellent capability for long-range distributed strain and temperature measurements. The fibre is used as sensing element and a value for temperature and/or strain can be obtained from any point along the fibre. While classical configurations have practically a spatial resolution limited by the phonon lifetime to 1 meter, novel approaches have been demonstrated these past years that can overcome this limit. This can be achieved either by the prior activation of the acoustic wave by a long lasting pre-pumping signal, leading to the optimized configuration using Brillouin echoes, or by probing a classically generated steady acoustic wave using a ultra-short pulse propagating in the orthogonal polarization of a highly birefringent fibre. These novel configurations can offer spatial resolutions in the centimetre range, while preserving the full accuracy on the determination of temperature and strain.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFourth European Workshop on Optical Fibre Sensors
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event4th European Workshop on Optical Fibre Sensors - Porto, Portugal
Duration: 8 Sep 201010 Sep 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7653
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

Conference4th European Workshop on Optical Fibre Sensors
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityPorto
Period8/09/1010/09/10

Keywords

  • Distributed fibre sensor
  • Fibre optics
  • Nonlinear optics
  • Optical fibre sensor
  • Stimulated Brillouin scattering

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