Quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar virchow isolates from humans and poultry in Israel: Evidence for clonal expansion

Hadas Solnik-Isaac, Miriam Weinberger, Mina Tabak, Alon Ben-David, Dina Shachar, Sima Yaron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow is highly prevalent in humans and farm animals in Israel. In addition to high rates of resistance to multiple antibiotics, this serovar exhibits a high incidence of resistance to nalidixic acid. More than 90% of Salmonella serovar Virchow isolates of human and poultry origin obtained from 1997 to 2004 were resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC ≥ 128 μg/ml), with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC between 0.125 and 0.250 μg/ml). Most isolates belonged to two predominant, closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis image types. Investigation of the mechanisms of quinolone resistance revealed that this pathogen probably emerged from a parental clone that overproduced the AcrAB efflux pump and had a single point mutation in gyrA leading to the Asp87Tyr substitution. The close resemblance between human and poultry isolates points to poultry as a likely source of Salmonella serovar Virchow in the food chain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2575-2579
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

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