Questioning a publication bias between industry-funded and non-industry-funded randomized controlled trials on biological and small molecule therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

Neta Cohen*, Ronnie Gur Lavie, Ya'ara Manor, Michael Mimouni, Daniel E. Furst, Gil Amarilyo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There has been a significant increase in financial support of clinical research by the pharmaceutical industry. Methods: We performed a comprehensive systematic literature review to determine whether there is publication bias for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) studies between industry-funded and non-industry funded randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and between RCTs with positive results (PRs) and those with negative results (NRs) of FDAapproved biological and small molecule drug therapy for RA. Each RCT was classified as having either a PR or a NR, and as having received commercial funding or not. Results: Most (297/349, 85.18%) of the RCTs were commercially funded. There was no significant difference in PRs or association with publication between commercially and noncommercially funded RCTs. Sample size was significantly larger in commercially funded RCTs and in those with PRs, and it was the only significant parameter that predicted publication in higher impact factor journals in the field of RA. Conclusion: There is no significant association between commercial funding and the publication of positive results or the publication of an RCT in higher impact factor journals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-11
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Biological drugs
  • Publication bias
  • RCT's
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

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