Quality of life of immigrant and non-immigrant infertile patients in a publicly funded in vitro fertilisation program: a cross-sectional study

J. Hasson, T. Tulandi, T. Shavit, T. Shaulov, E. Seccareccia, J. Takefman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether there are differences in fertility quality of life (FertiQoL) and socio-demographic characteristics between immigrants and non-immigrant patients attending a government-funded fertility program. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: McGill University Reproductive Center in Montreal, Canada, at a time when governmental funding for in vitro fertilisation (IVF) was provided to all residents. Population: All infertile patients, males and females, attending the center between March and July 2015. Methods: Patients were invited to complete anonymous questionnaires which included socio-demographic items and the validated FertiQoL questionnaire. Main outcome measures: Socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, marital state, infertility type & duration, previous IVF attempts; education, employment, income, ethnicity, spoken languages) and FertiQoL scores. Results: In all, 1020 patients completed the questionnaires; of these, 752 (77.7%) non-immigrant Canadian citizens and 215 (22.3%) resident immigrants were included in the analysis. Median duration in Canada for immigrants was 4 years. Immigrants were more likely to have university/graduate degrees (75% versus 64%), to be unemployed (37% versus 13.1%) and to have lower annual household incomes (72.8% versus 39.5%, all P < 0.05). They also reported poorer QoL and achieved significantly lower scores in the emotional, mind/body, social, treatment and total FertiQoL domains. Multivariate analysis showed male gender, lower education level and Caucasian/European ethnicity to be significantly associated with higher QoL. Conclusions: Despite governmental funding of IVF, immigrants experience reduced fertility QoL, implying cost is not the only barrier to IVF use. The reduced QoL may stem from cross-cultural differences in infertility perception. This population may be at greater risk for depression and anxiety and should be flagged accordingly. Tweetable abstract: Immigrants’ fertility QoL is lower despite publicly funded IVF implying cost is not the only barrier to IVF use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1841-1847
Number of pages7
JournalBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume124
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Fertility quality of life
  • immigrants
  • publicly funded in vitro fertilisation
  • socio-demographic parameters

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Quality of life of immigrant and non-immigrant infertile patients in a publicly funded in vitro fertilisation program: a cross-sectional study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this