Prognostic value of cardiac troponin I re-elevation following percutaneous coronary intervention in high-risk patients with acute coronary syndromes

Shmuel Fuchs*, Luis Gruberg, Sandeep Singh, Eugenio Stabile, Charles Duncan, Hongsheng Wu, Ron Waksman, Lowell F. Satler, Augusto D. Pichard, Kenneth M. Kent, Ran Kornowski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Troponin I is a predictive marker of short- and intermediate-term adverse cardiac events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). These high-risk patients may benefit from early percutaneous coronary intervention. However, whether additional myocardial injury, defined as postprocedural troponin I elevation, may be associated with adverse short- and intermediate-term outcomes has not been fully explored. Accordingly, we studied 132 consecutive patients with non-ST-elevation ACS (62% with non-Q-wave myocardial infarction) and elevated troponin I levels at admission (>0.15 ng/ml) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention ≥48 hours after admission. Troponin I levels were routinely measured at 6 and 18 to 24 hours after intervention and patients were stratified according to the presence or absence of troponin I re-elevation, defined as postprocedural troponin I levels > 1 times the admission levels. In-hospital and cumulative 6-month clinical outcomes were compared between groups. Patients with troponin I re-elevation (n = 51) were older (68 ± 13 vs 64 ± 12 years, p = 0.05) and had experienced prior myocardial infarction more frequently (92.5 vs 82.1, p = 0.09), but otherwise had similar baseline clinical characteristics. Patients with troponin I re-elevation had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (9.8% vs 0%, p = 0.016) and a higher 6-month cumulative death rate (24% vs 3.7%, p = 0.001). There was a trend for an increased 6-month myocardial infarction rate in patients with troponin I re-elevation (13.7% vs 3.7%, p = 0.11) and target vessel revascularization was similar between groups (16.7% vs 17.4%, p = 0.92). By multivariate analysis, troponin I re-elevation (odds ratio [OR] 6.2, p = 0.011) and diabetes mellitus (OR 5.7, p = 0.014) were the strongest independent predictors for increased 6-month cumulative mortality, whereas creatine kinase MB-fraction re-elevation had no prognostic value. We conclude that troponin I re-elevation after percutaneous coronary intervention in high-risk patients with ACS is associated with a substantial increase in mortality and reduced event-free survival at 6-month follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-133
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jul 2001
Externally publishedYes

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