Primary coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass in impaired left ventricular function

Yaron Moshkovitz, Leonid Sternik, Yoav Paz, Jacob Gurevitch, Micha S. Feinberg, Aram K. Smolinsky, Rephael Mohr*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Conventional coronary artery bypass grafting using cardiopulmonary bypass carries relatively high mortality and morbidity for patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Methods. Seventy-five patients with ejection fraction less than or equal to 0.35 underwent primary coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass between December 1991 and December 1994. Thirty-two patients (43%) had congestive heart failure, 11 (15%) were referred for operation within the first 24 hours of evolving myocardial infarction, and 21 (28%) up to 1 week after acute myocardial infarction. Eighteen patients (24%), 6 of whom were in cardiogenic shock, underwent emergency operations. Results. Mean number of grafts/patient was 1.9 (range 1 to 4), and internal mammary artery was used in 66 patients (85%). Only 17 patients (23%) received a graft to a circumflex marginal artery. Two patients (2.7%) died perioperatively, and 1 (1.3%) sustained stroke. At mean follow-up of 28 months, 13 patients had died, and angina had returned in 7 (10.5%). One- and four-year actuarial survival was 96% and 73%, respectively. Conclusions. Coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass is a viable alternative to conventional coronary artery bypass grafting particularly for patients with extreme left ventricular dysfunction or those with coexisting risk factors, such as acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S44-S47
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume63
Issue number6 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997
Externally publishedYes

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