Prevalence of cholelithiasis in non-diabetic haemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

Z. Korzets, E. Golan, S. Ben-Chitrit, N. Schneider, A. Chagnac, R. Carel, J. Bernheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Haemodialyzed (HD) patients have been found to have an increased bile cholesterol level and an increased saturation index in bile. These changes were markedly enhanced in the presence of a low-protein diet. To evaluate whether such changes influence the prevalence of cholelithiasis in patients with end-stage renal failure, real-time sonography was performed to detect the presence of gallstones (GS) in 54 HD (28 males, 26 females, mean age 52.4 ± 15.4 years) and 39 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD; 22 males, 17 females, mean age 59.1 ± 14.9 years) patients. No patient had diabetes. The patients' charts were reviewed for the following data: age, sex, primary renal disease, obesity (20% above ideal weight), history suggestive of gallbladder disease or previous cholecystectomy, duration of dialysis, and serum cholesterol levels. Overall, cholelithiasis was documented in 12 of 93 (12.9%) patients, 7 HD and 5 CAPD. When comparing the factors outlined above, no significant difference was found between HD and CAPD patient groups, either with or without cholelithiasis. Gallbladder disease was asymptomatic in all except 1 patient who required cholecystectomy. Using a healthy control group consisting of local age- and sex-matched inhabitants, GS were found in 8 of 134 (6%) of them (p > 0.05). We conclude that the prevalence rate of GS in our dialysis population (HD and CAPD) is similar to that of a local general population following a western-style diet, irrespective of dialysis mode.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-47
Number of pages4
JournalNephron
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Cholelithiasis
  • Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis
  • Non-diabetic dialysis patients

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