Presenting symptoms, admission electrocardiogram, management, and prognosis in acute coronary syndromes: differences by age.

Shlomo Stern*, Solomon Behar, Jonathan Leor, David Harpaz, Valentina Boyko, Shmuel Gottlieb

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a nationwide survey conducted in all 26 hospitals in Israel during February and March 2000, data were collected on 2133 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients. The patients were divided into three age subgroups: <65 years (n=974), 65-74 years (n=500), and > or =75 years (n=639). The frequency of no anginal pain/atypical symptoms on presentation increased with age for all acute coronary syndrome patients (14%, 21%, and 32%, in the three age subgroups, respectively; p for trend <0.0001). The frequency of ST-elevation on admission electrocardiogram decreased with advancing age (59%, 46%, and 42%, in the three age subgroups, respectively; p for trend <0.0001), whereas ST-depression gradually increased (14%, 24%, and 28%, respectively; p for trend <0.0001). In multivariate analysis, variables associated with no anginal pain/atypical symptoms on presentation (in decreasing order) were: history of heart failure, age, lack of past angina, diabetes, and nonsmoking. ST-elevation was inversely associated with no anginal pain/atypical symptoms on admission (odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.63). The use of acute reperfusion therapy significantly declined with advancing age. Seven-day, 30-day, and 1-year mortality increased with advancing age. No anginal pain/atypical symptoms on presentation were associated with an increased early and late mortality in all three age subgroups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-196
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Cardiology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Presenting symptoms, admission electrocardiogram, management, and prognosis in acute coronary syndromes: differences by age.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this