Prediction of hospital mortality rates by admission laboratory tests

Paul Froom, Zvi Shimoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to explore whether electronically retrieved laboratory data can predict mortality in internal medicine departments in a regional hospital. Methods: All 10 308 patients hospitalized in internal medicine departments over a 1-year period were included in the cohort. Nearly all patients had a complete blood count and basic clinical chemistries on admission. We used logistic regression analysis to predict the 573 deaths (5.6%), including all variables that added significantly to the model. Results: Eight laboratory variables and age significantly and independently contributed to a logistic regression model (area under the ROC curve, 88.7%). The odds ratio for the final model per quartile of risk was 6.44 (95% confidence interval, 5.42-7.64), whereas for age alone, the odds ratio per quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval, 1.84-2.19). Conclusions: A logistic regression model including only age and electronically retrieved laboratory data highly predicted mortality in internal medicine departments in a regional hospital, suggesting that age and routine admission laboratory tests might be used to ensure a fair comparison when using mortality monitoring for hospital quality control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-328
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

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