Predicting late restenosis after coronary angioplasty by very early (12 to 24 h) thallium-201 scintigraphy: Implications with regard to mechanisms of late coronary restenosis

Ruth Hardoff, Arie Shefer, Sarah Gips, Amnon Merdler, Moshe Y. Flugelman, David A. Halon, Basil S. Lewis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To examine whether late coronary restenosis may be predicted by abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in the early hours after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and to study in greater detail the mechanisms involved in the development of late coronary restenosis after angioplasty, a prospective study was undertaken in 90 consecutive patients. Thallium-201 scintigrams were recorded at rest and during the stress of atrial pacing, 12 to 24 h after angioplasty, and the results were related to the findings at angiography in 70 patients undergoing late cardiac catheterization. A reversible thallium-201 perfusion defect was found in 39 (38%) of 104 myocardial regions supplied by the dilated coronary vessel and identified a subset of patients at high risk of late (6 to 12 months) angiographic restenosis (sensitivity 77%, specificity 67%). In contrast, late coronary restenosis developed in only 7 (11%) of 65 vessels and in 5 (14%) of 37 patients with a nonischemic thallium-201 scintigram on day 1 (p < 0.005). Multivariate logistic regression analysis of 14 possible preangloplasty and periangioplasty clinical and angiographic variables selected reversible perfusion defect on the thallium-201 scintigram on day 1(p = 0.016) and Immediate postangioplasty residual coronary narrowing (p = 0.004) as significant independent predictors of late restenosis, with younger patient age as an additional less powerful predictor (p < 0.05). The findings have important implications regarding the pathogenesis of late coronary restenosis in patients undergoing successful angioplasty and they imply that in the majority of these patients pathophysiologic events in the early minutes and hours after angioplasty may determine the development of late restenosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1486-1492
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1990
Externally publishedYes

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