Predicting factors for endometrial thickness during treatment with assisted reproductive technology

Wiser Amir, Baum Micha, Hourwitz Ariel, Lerner Geva Liat, Dor Jehoshua, Shulman Adrian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To discover the factors contributing to endometrial thickness, and to assess the impact of endometrial thickness on pregnancy rates (PRs) according to these factors. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: In vitro fertilization unit in a university hospital. Patient(s): All women with primary infertility and no previous pregnancies who underwent IVF treatment at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel, between August 9, 2001-December 31, 2004. Intervention: Measurement of endometrial thickness by the use of transvaginal ultrasound probe on the day that hCG was administered during an IVF cycle. Main Outcome Measure(s): Factors influencing endometrial thickness and the relationship between endometrial thickness and PRs. Result(s): The mean endometrial thickness decreased as a function of the patient's age. The thickest endometrium was found in patients <25 years of age (11.9 ± 2.5 mm), and the thinnest endometrium was found in patients >40 years of age (9.6 ± 2.3 mm). Other factors, such as E2 levels, etiology of infertility, induction of ovulation protocol, and type of gonadotropin used, were also found to contribute to endometrial thickness. Conclusion(s): Our data support the case for an "aging" of the endometrium. The chances of achieving a thick endometrium for patients >40 years of age are lower than for younger patients. Furthermore, a thicker endometrium is correlated with a higher PR only for patients >35 years of age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)799-804
Number of pages6
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Endometrial thickness
  • ICSI
  • IVF
  • age
  • pregnancy

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