Plowing the atrium and growing thrombi: Two cases of large atrial thrombi following ablative and surgical procedure for atrial fibrillation

Shemy Carasso, Rafael Kuperstein, Eli Konen, Michael Glikson, Micha S. Feinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: We present two patients with a large left atrial (LA) thrombus following invasive treatment for atrial fibrillation and inadequate anticoagulation. Methods and results: Case 1: A 30-year-old woman, with a one-year history of symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation resistant to medical therapy, underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. Three days after the procedure the patient presented with dizziness, fatigue, rapid atrial fibrillation with a sub-therapeutic INR. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed a large LA thrombus. Case 2: A 59-year-old male, with severe mitral regurgitation and chronic atrial fibrillation, underwent mitral valve repair and Cox-Maze procedure. Three months later, while asymptomatic, a follow-up transthoracic echocardiography a large posterior LA thrombus was imaged. His INR was also sub-therapeutic. Both patients were treated by enhancing anticoagulation and close echocardiographic follow-up. So far both patients have remained asymptomatic two months following discharge. Conclusion: Large LA thrombi detected by transthoracic echocardiography are a rare complication of the Cox-Maze procedure and radio-frequency ablation for atrial fibrillation, which may occur even in patients with restored normal sinus rhythm receiving inadequate anticoagulation therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-386
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Echocardiography
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Maze procedure
  • Radio-frequency ablation
  • Thrombus

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