Personality traits’ effects on self-efficacy and outcome expectations for high school major choice

Dikla Brown*, Rachel Gali Cinamon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study focuses on the contribution of the Big Five personality traits to the development of self-efficacy and outcome expectations regarding selection of a high school major among 368 Israeli adolescents (Mage = 16.07, SD = 0.41). Structural equation analyses showed that higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion and lower neuroticism contributed to higher self-efficacy. In contrast, higher levels of conscientiousness and neuroticism and lower extraversion contributed to higher outcome expectations. These findings expand our understanding regarding personality characteristics serving as antecedents of self-efficacy and outcome expectations and sets important implications for career interventions with adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-361
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Big Five personality traits
  • Decision making self efficacy

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