Perinatal risk factors for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in a national cohort of very-low-birthweight infants

Gil Klinger, Nir Sokolover, Valentina Boyko, Lea Sirota, Liat Lerner-Geva, Brian Reichman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We sought to assess the independent effect of perinatal factors on the risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in very-low-birthweight infants. Study Design: This was a population-based observational study. Data were prospectively collected by the Israel Neonatal Network. Multivariable analyses identified independent risk factors for BPD. Results: Of 12,139 infants surviving to a postmenstrual age of 36 weeks, 1663 (13.7%) developed BPD. BPD was independently associated with young maternal age (odds ratio [OR], 1.53), maternal hypertensive disorders (OR, 1.28), antepartum hemorrhage (OR, 1.26), male gender (OR, 1.41), non-Jewish ethnicity (OR, 1.23), birth defects (OR, 1.94), small for gestational age (GA) (OR, 2.65), and delivery room resuscitation (OR, 1.86). Stratified analysis by GA groups showed that postdelivery resuscitation had a more pronounced effect with increasing maturity. Conclusion: Perinatal factors and pregnancy complications were independently associated with development of BPD in very-low-birthweight infants. Most risk factors identified were consistent within GA groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115.e1-115.e9
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume208
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Keywords

  • bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • preterm infant
  • risk factors
  • very-low-birthweight

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