Perceptions of world benevolence, meaningfulness, and self-worth among elderly israeli holocaust survivors and non-survivors

Edward Prager*, Zahava Solomon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that traumatic events may challenge and even disrupt basic individual assumptions about the world, including the perception of the world as a benevolent place, the meaningfulness of the world, and the self-worth of the individual. The present study compared the cognitive schemata of 61 Israeli Holocaust survivors and 131 controls. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated a significant overall Holocaust effect on World Assumptions. Univariate F tests implicated two of the three schemata investigated: world benevolence and world meaning. Exposure to the Holocaust accounted for almost all the explained variance in the world benevolence scheme, while sociodemographic variables contributed almost all of the explained variance to world meaning and self-worth. The theoretical implication of the results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-277
Number of pages13
JournalAnxiety, Stress and Coping
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1995

Keywords

  • Holocaust survivors
  • aging process
  • attribution of meaning
  • trauma victims

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