Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) courses in Israel: Ten years of experience

Yehezkel Waisman*, Lisa Amir, Meirav Mor, Marc Mimouni

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The Pediatric Advanced Life Support course of the American Heart Association/American Academy of Pediatrics was established in Israel in 1994 and has since been presented to over 3,108 medical and paramedical personnel. Objectives: To assess the achievements of participants in the PALS course, as a cohort and by professional group, and their evaluations of different aspects of the course; and to describe the educational modifications introduced to the course since its introduction in Israel based on our teaching experience. Methods: The study sample consisted of physicians, nurses and paramedics from all areas of Israel who registered for PALS between January 2001 and December 2003. Participants took a standardized test before and after the course; a score of 80 or higher was considered a pass. On completion of the course, participants were requested to complete a 24-item questionnaire evaluating the quality of the course as a whole, as well as the lectures, skill stations, and instructors' performance. Items were rated on a 5-point scale. Results were analyzed using the BMPD statistical package. Results: Altogether, 739 subjects participated in 28 courses: 13 attending (in-hospital) physicians (1.8%), 89 community pediatricians (12%), 124 residents (16.8%), 304 nurses (41.1%), and 209 paramedics (28.3%). About half (48.9%) were hospital-based, and about half (47.9%) had no experience in emergency medicine. A passing grade was achieved by 89.4% of the participants; the mean grade for the whole sample was 87.2%. The mean test score of the residents was significantly better than that of the nurses (P < 0.05) and pediatricians (P < 0.01). The median evaluation score for four of the five stations was 5, and the mean overall score for all items was 4.56 (range by item 3.93-4.78). Conclusions: PALS was successfully delivered to a large number of healthcare providers in various professional groups with very good overall achievements and high participant satisfaction. It significantly increased participants' knowledge of pediatric resuscitation. We therefore recommend the PALS course as an educational tool in Israel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)639-642
Number of pages4
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume7
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Keywords

  • Children
  • Education
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support
  • Resuscitation

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