Patterns of two psychogeriatric hospitalization services in israel: A one‐year survey

Jeremia Heinik, Yoram Barak, Igor Salgenik, Avner Elizur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We compare two different approaches to inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations in the elderly (age 65+) in Israel. In one, 79 patients were hospitalized during the year 1993 in specialized psychogeriatric wards, at Sha'ar Menashe (ShM) psychiatric hospital. In the other, 133 patients were hospitalized during the same period in general psychiatric wards, at Abarbanel (Ab) psychiatric hospital. This study retrospectively evaluates: demographic data, sources of referral, characteristics of emergency admissions, psychiatric history, psychiatric diagnoses, use of medical services, and outcome measures (length of hospitalization, death rates, nursing status at discharge, placement at discharge). Rate of admission (per 100 000 population) is 2.2‐fold higher at ShM than at Ab. The two centres differ significantly in sources of referral (closer links with geriatric services at ShM) and the use of medical services (prevailing use of medical ambulatory services and the hospital's internal medicine wards at ShM, while at Ab more patients were referred for general hospital evaluations). All other variables studied (demographics, characteristics of emergency admissions, psychiatric history, psychiatric diagnoses, outcome measures) were similar between the two centres. The discussion emphasizes the 'audit' orientation of the study. It also stresses the surprising lack of differences between centres in some major variables, and frames research questions for future use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1051-1057
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995

Keywords

  • hospitalization
  • patterns
  • psychogeriatric

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