Patterns of psychiatric hospitalizations among migrant workers and asylum-seekers in Israel: a single hospital archive study, 2005–2011

Ido Lurie, Yael Barnea, Yael Caspi, Liraz Olmer, Yehuda Baruch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Migrants have increased risk for psychiatric hospitalizations. Over the last decades Israel has become a destination for migration of migrant workers and asylum-seekers. Methods: The current retrospective study retrieved socio-demographic, clinical and migration-related chart data for 117 migrants admitted to a major Israeli psychiatric hospital between 2005–2011, to delineate characteristics and risk-factors for psychiatric hospitalizations. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to predict re-hospitalization. Results: Of the study sample, 61% were single men, 20% had been exposed to trauma, 15% had prior psychiatric hospitalizations and 24% had attempted suicide. Approximately, 76% were involuntarily hospitalized and diagnosed with psychosis. None were diagnosed with PTSD. Approximately, 20% were re-hospitalized. Factors significantly associated with re-hospitalization were male gender (OR = 15.2, 95%, CI 1.8–126.9, p = 0.012), prior psychiatric hospitalization (OR = 15.4, 95% CI 2.1–111.9, p < 0.01), being single (OR = 5.96, 95% CI1.14–31.07, p = 0.03) and traumatic exposure (OR = 4.75, 95% CI: 1.17–19.36, p= 0.03). Shorter duration in Israel, unemployment, asylum-seekers, no temporary-visa and use of restraints were more prevalent among those re-hospitalized. Conclusion: Identification of migrants at risk and trauma-informed, culturally relevant services can reduce hospitalizations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalNordic Journal of Psychiatry
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Asylum-seekers
  • migrant workers
  • migration
  • psychiatric hospitalization
  • trauma

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