Patient characteristics correlated with quality indicator outcomes in diabetes care

Michal Shani*, Sasson Nakar, Alex Lustman, Tuvia Baievsky, Reena Rosenberg, Shlomo Vinker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Quality indicators were adopted to compare quality of care across health systems. Aim To evaluate whether patient characteristics influence primary care physicians' diabetes quality indicators. Design of study Retrospective cohort study. Setting Primary care setting. Method The study was conducted in the Central District of Clalit Health Service in Israel. The five measures of diabetes follow-up were: the percentage of patients with diabetes for whom glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), microalbumin, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)cholesterol, and blood pressure were measured at least once, and the percentage of patients who were seen by an ophthalmologist, during 2005. Three outcome measures were chosen: the percentage of patients with diabetes and HbA1c <7 mg%, the percentage of patients with diabetes and blood pressure <130/80 mmHg, and the percentage of patients with diabetes and LDL-cholesterol <100 mg/dl in 2005. Sociodemographic information was retrieved about all the physicians' patients with diabetes. Results One-hundred and seventy primary care physicians took care of 18 316 patients with diabetes. The average number of patients with diabetes per physician was 107 (range 10-203). A lower quality indicator score for HbA1c <7 mg% was correlated with a higher percentage of patients of low socioeconomic status (P<0.001) and new immigrants (P = 0.002), and correlated with borderline significance with higher mean patients' body mass index (P = 0.024); lower quality indicator score for blood pressure <130/80 mmHg was related to higher patients' age (P = 0.006). None of the diabetes follow-up measures were related to patients' characteristics. Conclusion Achieving good glycaemic control is dependent on patient characteristics. New immigrants, patients of low socioeconomic status, and older patients need special attention to avoid disparities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-659
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume60
Issue number578
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Family physician
  • Family practice
  • Immigrant
  • Quality indicator
  • Socioeconomic factor

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