Patch testing in Israeli children with suspected allergic contact dermatitis: A retrospective study and literature review

Yaron Zafrir, Akiva Trattner, Emmillia Hodak, Oren Eldar, Moshe Lapidoth, Dan Ben Amitai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background/objectives: Childhood allergic contact dermatitis is recognized as a significant clinical problem. The objective was to evaluate the rate of positive patch tests in Israeli children with clinically suspected allergic contact dermatitis, identify possible sex and age differences, compare results with those in Israeli adults, and review pediatric studies in the literature. Methods: The study sample included 343 children and adolescents (197 female, 146 male; 1-18 years of age, mean age 11.8 years) with clinically suspected allergic contact dermatitis who underwent patch testing with a standard pediatric series of 23 allergens at a tertiary medical center from 1999 to 2012. Data on clinical characteristics and test results were collected retrospectively from the medical files. Results: Ninety-eight subjects (28.6%) (75 girls [38.1%], 23 boys [15.8%]) had at least one positive reaction. The most frequent reactions were to nickel sulfate, followed by potassium dichromate and cobalt chloride. Nickel sulfate sensitivity was more common in girls, especially those younger than 3 years and older than 12 years. The prevalence of contact sensitization was similar in subjects with and without atopic dermatitis (50% and 51%, respectively). Conclusion: Nickel is the most common allergen in Israeli children, especially girls. Patch testing should be performed in children with clinically suspected allergic contact dermatitis regardless of atopic background.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-86
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • allergic contact dermatitis
  • child
  • patch test

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