Overproduction of human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in transfected cells: extenuation of paraquat-mediated cytotoxicity and enhancement of lipid peroxidation.

O. Elroy-Stein, Y. Bernstein, Y. Groner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The 'housekeeping' enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) is encoded by a gene residing on human chromosome 21, at the region 21q22 known to be involved in Down's syndrome. The SOD-1 gene and the SOD-1 cDNA were introduced into mouse L-cells and human HeLa cells, respectively as part of recombinant plasmids containing the neoR selectable marker. Human and mouse transformants were obtained that expressed elevated levels (up to 6-fold) of authentic, enzymatically active human SOD-1. This enabled us to examine the consequences of hSOD-1 gene dosage, apart from gene dosage effects contributed by other genes residing on chromosome 21. Human and mouse cell clones that overproduce the hSOD-1 had altered properties; they were more resistant to paraquat than the parental cells and showed an increase in lipid peroxidation. The data are consistent with the possibility that gene dosage of hSOD-1 contributes to some of the clinical symptoms associated with Down's syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-622
Number of pages8
JournalEMBO Journal
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1986

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