Outcome of elderly patients with venous thromboembolism treated with direct oral anticoagulants—A retrospective cohort study

Irit Ayalon-Dangur, Yakov Vega, Miriam Rozi Israel, Alon Grossman, Galia Spectre, Tzippy Shochat, Leonard Leibovici, Anat Gafter-Gvili

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Randomized controlled trials that compared direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), demonstrated both efficacy and safety of DOACs. The aim of the current study was to compare DOACs to VKA for the treatment of VTE in the elderly, in a real-life setting. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed in Rabin Medical Center encompassing a 7-year period. Hospitalized patients >65 years, with a diagnosis of VTE discharged with DOACs or VKA were included. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause mortality, major bleeding, recurrent VTEs and hospitalizations throughout the follow-up period of one year. Results: A total of 603 patients were included in the final analysis. The mean age was 79.6 ± 8.5 years. The primary composite outcome occurred in 74.6% and 56.7% of the patients in the VKA group and DOACs group, respectively, hazard ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.76, in favor of the DOACs group. In a matched cohort analysis, the results were the same as the original analysis. Conclusion: In the elderly population, treatment of VTE with DOACs was associated with a lower rate of the composite outcome. DOACs are safe and effective for elderly patients with VTE.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5673
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Deep vein thrombosis
  • Direct oral anticoagulants
  • Elderly
  • Enoxaparin
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Venous thromboembolism
  • Vitamin K antagonists

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