Osteoprotegerin plasma levels are strongly associated with polymorphisms in human homologue of the mouse progressive ankylosis (ANKH) gene

Y. Vistoropsky, I. Malkin, E. Kobyliansky, Gregory Livshits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Osteoprotegerin inhibits osteoclastogenesis and plays an important role in the control of bone resorption. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying regulation of OPG levels are currently not fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the ANKH gene, which plays a central role in bone mineralization, contributes to the genetic regulation of OPG levels. A family-based association study used a sample of 159 ethnically homogeneous nuclear families, comprising 556 apparently healthy individuals. Statistical analyses included family aggregation analysis of OPG variation and four types of transmission disequilibrium tests. Each individual was genotyped for 11 SNPs in the ANKH gene. Four TDTs consistently showed a highly significant association between OPG levels and the intronic SNP rs875525 located between exons 6 and 7. The combined p-value for four tests to reject the null hypothesis of no association was 0.0003. Furthermore, haplotypes generated between rs875525 and two additional neighbouring SNPs (rs2291943 and rs2288474) also revealed a significant association with OPG plasma levels (p < 10-4-10-3). ANKH genetic polymorphisms in the area between SNP rs2291943 and rs2288474 are strongly associated with OPG plasma levels. The molecular mechanism underlying this association is not obvious, and therefore these results should be regarded cautiously until they are confirmed in independent studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)302-307
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Human Genetics
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Keywords

  • ELISA
  • Geneticassociation
  • LD
  • OPG
  • SNP
  • TDT

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