Osteogenic growth peptide increases blood and bone marrow cellularity and enhances engraftment of bone marrow transplants in mice

Olga Gurevitch, Shimon Slavin, Andras Muhlrad, Arye Shteyer, Dan Gazit, Michael Chorev, Marina Vidson, Malka Namdar-Attar, Esther Berger, Ilan Bleiberg, Itai Bab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) was characterized recently in regenerating bone marrow (BM) and normal serum. In vitro, the OGP regulates stromal-cell proliferation and differentiated functions. In vivo, an increase in serum OGP accompanies the osteogenic phase of postablation BM regeneration. The present results in normal mice show that OGP induces a balanced increase in WBC counts and overall BM cellularity. In mice receiving myeloablative irradiation and syngeneic or semiallogeneic BM transplants, OGP stimulates hematopoietic reconstruction and doubles the survival rate; these effects are dependent on initiating the OGP administration before irradiation. Chimerism measurements in semiallogeneic graft recipients suggest no preferential effect of OGP on residual host cells. The data implicate OGP in the acceleration of hematopoiesis secondary to expansion of the stromal microenvironment and/or enhancement of stroma-derived signals to stem cells. The low-dose effectiveness of OGP is explained by the demonstration of an autocrine positive feedback loop that together with the OGP-binding protein sustains high serum levels of the peptide. A potential OGP-based treatment in combination with chemoradiotherapy is attractive because of the OGP-induced balanced multilineage enhancement of hematopoiesis and possible replacement of expensive recombinant cytokines by a readily synthesized peptide.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4719-4724
Number of pages6
JournalBlood
Volume88
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Dec 1996

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