ORGANIZATIONAL STRESS THROUGH THE LENS OF CONSERVATION OF RESOURCES (COR) THEORY

Mina Westman, Stevan E. Hobfoll, Shoshi Chen, Oranit B. Davidson, Shavit Laski

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

We examined how Conservation of Resources (COR) theory has been applied to work and stress in organizational settings. COR theory has drawn increasing interest in the organizational literature. It is both a stress and motivational theory that outlines how individuals and organizations are likely to be impacted by stressful circumstances, what those stressful circumstances are likely to be, and how individuals and organizations act in order to garner and protect their resources. To date, individual studies and meta-analyses have found COR theory to be a major explanatory model for understanding the stress process at work. Applications of COR theory to burnout, respite, and preventive intervention were detailed. Studies have shown that resource loss is a critical component of the stress process in organizations and that limiting resource loss is a key to successful prevention and post-stress intervention. Applications for future work, moving COR theory to the study of the acquisition, maintenance, fostering, and protection of key resources was discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationExploring Interpersonal Dynamics
PublisherJAI Press
Pages167-220
Number of pages54
ISBN (Print)0762311533, 9780762311538
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Publication series

NameResearch in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Volume4
ISSN (Print)1479-3555

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