Optimising the dose of oral midazolam sedation for dental procedures in children: A prospective, randomised, and controlled study

Mostafa Somri*, Constantinos A. Parisinos, Johny Kharouba, Naomi Cherni, Ami Smidt, Zackariya Abu Ras, Geith Darawshi, Luis A. Gaitini

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Midazolam sedation poses a significant dilemma in paediatric dentistry, which is to find out the optimal dosing with minimal undesirable adverse events. In this study, we aimed to compare the effect of three doses of oral midazolam (0.5, 0.75, and 1mg/kg) on the sedative state and cooperative behaviour of children during dental treatment. We further compared completion rates, parent satisfaction, and all adverse events. Design. Ninety children aged 3-10years were randomised to three equal groups. Groups A, B, and C received 0.5, 0.75, and 1mg/kg of oral midazolam, respectively. Levels of sedation, cooperative behaviour, procedures completion rates, parent satisfaction, and adverse events were prospectively recorded. Results. Sedation scores in B and C were higher (P<0.001) than in A. Cooperation scores (CS) in B and C were higher (P<0.001) than in A. Significant increase in completion rates was observed between A and C (P=0.025). Parent satisfaction was greater in B and C (P<0.001) compared to A. Adverse events were higher in C (P<0.05) than in A or B. Conclusion. Amount of 0.75mg/kg oral midazolam appears to be the optimal oral dose in terms of effectiveness, acceptability, and safety for dental treatments in paediatric patients, when administered by an experienced, paediatric anaesthetist.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-279
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Paediatric Dentistry
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

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