On the relation between reliance and compliance in an aided visual scanning task

Rebecca Wiczorek*, Joachim Meyer, Torsten Guenzler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Alarms, alerts, and other binary cues affect user behavior in complex ways. One relevant distinction is the suggestion that there are two different responses to alerts - compliance (the tendency to perform an action cued by the alert) and reliance (the tendency to refrain from actions as long as no alert is issued). An experiment tested the dependence of the two behaviors on the Positive and Negative Predictive Values of the alerts (PPV and NPV) to determine whether these are indeed two different behaviors. Results suggest that the compliance is relatively stable and unaffected by irrelevant information (the NPV), while reliance is also affected by the PPV. The results are discussed in terms of multiple-process theories of trust in information sources.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages253-257
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: 22 Oct 201226 Oct 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period22/10/1226/10/12

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