Officers' attitudes toward combat stress reaction: Responsibility, treatment, return to unit, and personal distance

D. Inbar, Z. Solomon, U. Aviram, S. Spiro, M. Kotler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the attitudes of 176s Israel Defense Forces officers toward combat stress reaction (CSR) in four areas: (1) the degree of personal responsibility the officer accepts for the treatment of the CSR casualty; (2) the type of treatment the officer views as most effective for CSR; (3) the officer's willingness to accept the CSR casualty's return to the unit following treatment; and (4) the personal distance the officer experiences between himself and the phenomenon. The impact of the following variables on officer's attitudes was assessed: casualty's rank, casualty's level of combat skill, presence of an additional physical injury, type of symptomatology, and respondent's background variables. Each officer was presented with one of 24 vignettes describing a CSR incident and was requested to fill in an attitudes questionnaire. Findings revealed that officers were more severe and less tolerant in relation to the CSR casualty who was an officer than toward lower ranking casualties. Officers were expected to take more responsibility for their own recovery than simple soldiers, support of commanding officers was seen as less effective in their treatment, and respondents were less willing to accept them back into their units after treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-487
Number of pages8
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume154
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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