Nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms at drug resistance sites in non-B-subtype variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

Dan Turner, Bluma Brenner, Daniela Moisi, Mervi Detorio, Raymond Cesaire, Takashi Kurimura, Haruyo Mori, Max Essex, Shlomo Maayan, Mark A. Wainberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have compared nucleotide substitutions and polymorphisms at codons known to confer drug resistance in subtype B strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with similar substitutions in viruses of other subtypes. Genotypic analysis was performed on viruses from untreated individuals. Nucleotide and amino acid diversity at resistance sites was compared with a consensus subtype B reference virus. Among patients with non-subtype B infections, polymorphisms relative to subtype B were observed at codon 10 in protease (PR). These included silent substitutions (CTC→CTT, CTA, TTA) and an amino acid mutation, L10L Subtype A viruses possessed a V179I substitution in reverse transcriptase (RT). Subtype G viruses were identified by silent substitutions at codon 181 in RT (TAT→TAC). Similarly, subtype A/G viruses were identified by a substitution at position 67 in RT (GAC→GAT). Subtype C was distinguished by silent substitutions at codons 106 (GTA→GTG) and 219 (AAA→AAG) in RT and codon 48 (GGG→GGA) in PR. Variations relative to subtype B were seen at RT position 215 (ACC→ACT) for subtypes A and A/E. These substitutions and polymorphisms reflect different patterns of codon usage among viruses of different subtypes. However, the existence of different subtypes may only rarely affect patterns of drug resistance-associated mutations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2993-2998
Number of pages6
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume48
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

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