Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a prognostic factor in advanced stage ovarian carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

Lina Salman*, Gad Sabah, Ariella Jakobson-Setton, Oded Raban, Effi Yeoshoua, Ram Eitan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the prognostic significance of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) upon diagnosis, and its impact on surgical outcome, among patients with advanced stage ovarian carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Methods: A retrospective cohort study included all women with stage IIIC and IV ovarian carcinoma receiving NACT in Rabin Medical Center, Petah-Tikva, Israel; January 1, 2005, to June 30, 2017. Demographics and treatment outcome were compared between patients with NLR at diagnosis ≥6.0 and those with NLR <6.0. Primary outcome was optimal debulking (<1 cm largest residual disease). Overall survival was compared between groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results: Of 111 patients, 33 (29.7%) had NLR ≥6.0 at diagnosis, and 78 (70.3%) had NLR <6.0. No difference was found in rates of optimal debulking between the group with NLR ≥6.0 and that with NLR <6.0 (78.9% vs 84.7%, respectively, P=0.555). Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, NLR ≥6.0 was associated with significantly worse overall survival (P<0.05). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, elevated NLR was not statistically associated with poor overall survival (P=0.080). Conclusions: In advanced stage ovarian carcinoma, NLR ≥6.0 at diagnosis did not predict surgical outcome, however it was a predictive factor for poor overall survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-106
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume148
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Lymphocytes
  • Neutrophils
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Ratio
  • Surgical outcome
  • Survival

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