Naive optimism and decision making

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Abstract

Naive optimism is defined as the belief that good outcomes are more likely and bad outcomes are less likely to happen to oneself than they are to other people. Three determinants that influence the intensity of naive optimism, and the pattern of its interaction, are defined. These determinants are the value of an event's outcomes, the perceived controllability of an event, and the degree of affinity between a decision maker and the target figure who is actually affected by the outcomes of an event. The implications of these findings in regard to decision-making processes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages889
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)0879425970
StatePublished - Nov 1990
Event1990 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Duration: 4 Nov 19907 Nov 1990

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
ISSN (Print)0884-3627

Conference

Conference1990 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics
CityLos Angeles, CA, USA
Period4/11/907/11/90

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