Myocardial ultrasonic backscatter for characterization of ischemia and reperfusion: relationship to wall motion

Benico Barzilai, Zvi Vered, G. A. Mohr, Keith A. Wear, Michael Courtois, Burton E. Sobel, James G. Miller, Julio E. Pérez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have previously shown that cardiac cycle-dependent variation of integrated backscatter occurs in normal myocardium. To determine whether myocardial ischemia and reperfusion can be distinguished by real-time integrated backscatter imaging we performed 10 min balloon occlusion of the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery followed by reperfusion in 10 closed-chest anesthetized dogs. Images were obtained at baseline, during occlusion, and up to 120 min after reperfusion. We measured the magnitude and delay of cyclic variation of integrated backscatter in segments with and without asynergy. Radiolabeled microspheres were used to verify both ischemia and reperfusion. Ischemic segments exhibited decreased magnitude and increased normalized delay of cyclic variation of integrated backscatter (from 3.3± 0.3 dB to 1.4 ± 0.2 dB, mean ± SE; and from 0.95 ± 0.03 to 1.67 ± 0.15, respectively, all p ≤ 0.001). Reperfusion promptly restored the magnitude of cyclic variation toward normal. However, the delay of the cyclic variation was restored only partially. Wall motion analysis of the ischemic sites revealed persistent abnormalities throughout the reperfusion interval despite return to normal of the magnitude and delay of cyclic variation. Thus, real-time integrated backscatter imaging permits detection and differentiation of changes in myocardial acoustic properties indicative of ischemia and of subsequent reperfusion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-398
Number of pages8
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Echocardiography
  • Integrated backscatter
  • Myocardial reperfusion
  • Ultrasonic tissue characterization
  • Ultrasound

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