Mycetoma (Madura Foot) in Israel: Recent Cases and a Systematic Review of the Literature

Ohad Bitan, Yonit Wiener-Well, Rina Segal, Eli Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mycetoma is a chronic soft tissue infection caused by fungal or bacterial pathogens, and is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. Cases in developed countries outside the mycetoma belt are rare and usually imported by immigrants. Sporadic cases have been reported in Israel. Unpublished cases in the participating medical centers are reported. In addition, a systematic review of the literature was performed. All published mycetoma cases diagnosed in Israel were included with relevant variables collected. Twenty-one cases of mycetoma were diagnosed in Israel between 1942 and 2015, including four unpublished cases and 17 published cases. The mean age at diagnosis was 42 years (range 23-73), and 16 of the patients were male. The foot was the primary involved organ. Fifteen patients were immigrants from Yemen, Ethiopia, and Sudan. Five cases were autochthonous. One case was travel related. Among patients who developed symptoms after immigration, the mean time from exposure to symptom onset was 5.6 years (range 1-10 years). The mean time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 6.6 years (range 0.2-35 years). The autochthonous cases demonstrate that Israel is endemic of mycetoma. The immigrant population represents two distinct waves of immigration to Israel in the past century. Two unpublished cases of Ethiopian immigrants are the first reported cases of mycetoma acquired in Ethiopia. The diagnostic and therapeutic challenges along with the epidemiological data emphasize the need of raising the awareness of physicians to this devastating condition even in developed countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1355-1361
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume96
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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