Mothers of children infected with HIV: How mothers' cognitive coping strategies are related to their psychological distress and acceptance of their children

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Abstract

The main goal of the present study was to examine how the coping strategies of mothers of children infected with HIV are related to the mothers' psychological distress and their acceptance of their children. The study was conducted in Southern Kazakhstan in the wake of a children's HIV-epidemic caused by the use of unsterile instruments and infusions of infected blood in State hospitals. Mothers of children infected with HIV undergoing testing and treatment in the regional HIV Center participated in the study (n = 63). Focusing on planning and catastrophizing were the most frequently used coping strategies, while putting into perspective and self-blame were used the least often. Positive refocusing was associated with a lower level of psychological distress, and catastrophizing was associated with a higher level of psychological distress. Rumination and focusing on planning were associated with a higher level of acceptance of the child, while self-blame was associated with a lower level of acceptance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)681-684
Number of pages4
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Acceptance-rejection of the child
  • Cognitive coping strategies
  • Mothers of children infected with HIV
  • Psychological distress

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